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Government Responds to Productivity Commisson Inquiry into Data Availability and Use

The Government’s response to the Productivity Commission’s Inquiry into Data Availability & Use is now available, one year after the Productivity Commission (PC) released its 658-page final report.

Ethics Reviews, Trust and Mutual Acceptance

Our earlier blog posts highlighted the irony of numerous ethical reviews for the same research project, which makes us wonder about the validity of multiple opinions, besides creating huge administrative burdens and wasted time and costs for the researcher as well as the ethics committees themselves.

Guest Post by Professor Sallie Pearson - Punching below our weight: when data lies dormant

Thanks to a billion-dollar annual investment in the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) the bulk of Australia’s prescription medicine use is subsidised. One obvious benefit to this is that prescription medicine is more affordable for Australians. A less obvious benefit is that routinely collected PBS data provides comprehensive representation of prescription medicine use at a population level. This makes it an extraordinarily valuable data resource. The linkage of PBS, MBS and other Commonwealth collections, such as those held by the Department of Social Services, can expand our opportunities to explore value, real-world use and pivotal issues such as equity of access.

Human Research Ethics Committees (HRECS)

In our previous blog, The Ethics Quagmire: Case Studies you might have read the case study by Kathy Tannous concerning the difficulties she has faced getting ethics approval from three ethics committees. But are there problems closer to home for researchers, in their own institutions, even when only one HREC is involved? We think so. But the solution may also lie with these institutions, in the better application of existing guidelines. We explain how below.

The Ethics Quagmire: Case Studies

In Flying Blind 2, we have been highlighting the tortuous route of the researcher’s journey, as they negotiate the ethics processes and the myriad data sources required for their research. In the next few blogs, Australian health and medical researchers who have been through the journey, present real-life case studies and  back-of-the-envelope calculations of what it takes to identify existing data sets and negotiating the ethics processes, to link the data sets to support their research.

Outcomes of the Structural Review of NHMRC Grant Programs

In January 2016, National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) CEO Professor Anne Kelso announced a review of the structure of NHMRC’s grant program. The review aimed to determine if restructuring existing programs could optimise the significant public investment (approx. $800 million per annum) disbursed through NHMRC grant programs.

Primary and Secondary Uses of Health Data

Data is the primary resource - the life blood -  that drives evidence-based health and medical (H&M) research.  Traditionally, data collected explicitly for a clinical trial, designed to answer specific questions on behavioural or bio-medical questions, served as the primary research data for H&M researchers.  This practice started when administrative health data was not readily available in computable electronic format.

Trusting Data Custodians will Transform our Healthcare

Could you tell the triage nurse in the emergency department all the medications your elderly parent is taking? Before you go to Bali this winter, do you know whether you’ve ever been vaccinated against hepatitis A? And what was the name of that antibiotic you were allergic to years back?

All this information exists, most likely in the files of a GP or specialist, or a hospital you went to for treatment a couple of years ago. It is probably even stored electronically, but can you get it when you need it?